Political and social movements which have changed the course of human history have always been orchestrated by individuals with a clear vision, a consuming passion, the courage to swim upstream against the status quo, the willingness to deal with the consequences of swimming upstream, and the perseverance to keep going no matter what.

Though tremendous legislative strides have been made regarding both racial and gender equality, it is sad but true to acknowledge that racism and sexism still exist. They exist because “isms” are not legal conditions, they are heart conditions and legislation does not change hearts. Civil rights legislation taught us that. I believe that if sexism and racism are to truly come to an end, hearts need to change in a way that leaves people color-blind and gender-blind, seeing each other as equal—different yet equal.

My newest book, When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough, Swim Upstream, discusses how the Christian Church has contributed to maintaining gender inequality in the U.S. Throughout the book I encourage people to swim upstream against gender inequality wherever they see it. Excerpt from Introduction: “Helen Keller once said, ‘I cannot do everything, but I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do.’” Final words of the book: “Because God planted a passion inside me for a very specific calling and wired me with the temperament to fulfill this calling, I will not refuse to do the something I can do. I hope you do too.” Because I wrote these words I feel compelled to live them, i.e. walk the talk.

When Bobby Kennedy campaigned for the democratic presidential nomination in 1968 he repeatedly stated “Some men see things as they are and say why. I dream things that never were and say why not.”

My dream is that individuals will be able to make choices re: roles within families and relationships based on talents, abilities and spiritual gifts, rather than being assigned roles based on gender. Though I have this dream, I do not have any illusions that I will lead a political or social movement which will result in full gender equality. I also have no illusions that gender equality will become a reality in my lifetime. I wrote the book and try very hard to walk the talk in the hope that I will plant seeds for change in some hearts

Word of Caution: Those of us who are called to fight for gender equality in the church need to be careful about how we measure success. We need to remember that we can only control what we do, we cannot control what anyone else does in response to what we do. We also need to remember that this change in the church will only come when hearts change, and we cannot change hearts. Only God can change a heart. He may use us as instruments to change hearts, but he is the one who does the heart changing.

Another word of caution: As we swim upstream to advocate or fight for gender equality in the church, conflict and controversy will inevitably follow. We need to face it head on and deal with it in healthy ways. That’s what Jesus and the early apostles did when conflict and controversy erupted in response to their efforts to transition people from the old covenant to the new covenant. We cannot however, be conflict creators. We cannot create conflict for the sake of creating conflict. If we do that we are not operating out of pure motives. On the other hand, we cannot be conflict avoiders. If we are conflict avoiders we are operating out of fear, and “God has not given us a spirit of fear and timidity, but of power, love, and self-discipline” (2 Timothy 1:7).

For the record, it is not easy to swim upstream and walk the talk. Please know that I understand that what I’m asking people to do is not easy, and that I am not asking anyone to do anything I am not willing to do myself.

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Finished reviewing the edited version of my new manuscript, When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough, Swim Upstream. One more excerpt:

Lasting change begins on the inside, i.e. in our hearts. Our thoughts, feelings, attitudes and values change first. Then, our behavior changes to line up with the internal changes. If our hearts don’t change, we may be able to maintain behavioral changes for a while, however, it won’t last. We will eventually go back to behaving in a way that reflects our heart. Jesus Christ made this point to a group of Pharisees when he said “A good person produces good things from the treasury of a good heart, and an evil person produces evil things from the treasury of an evil heart” (Matthew 12:35).

Throughout this book I will be highlighting individuals who made significant contributions to both the civil rights movement and the women’s rights movement. I am hoping that their stories will touch your hearts, as well as encourage and inspire you to swim upstream against gender inequality in the church, if you feel moved to do so.

There is a critical difference, however, between effecting change in the world and effecting change in the church. That difference is: fighting for gender equality in the church is not about women’s rights or affirmative action. It is about spiritual liberation. It is about truly allowing Christ to be the head of the church by following the leading of the Holy Spirit when choosing who will serve in what ministry roles. It is about allowing individuals with the spiritual gift of leadership to lead, and allowing individuals with the spiritual gift of preaching, to preach, regardless of their gender.

 

 

Continuing to review the edited version of my new manuscript, When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough, Swim Upstream.

More excerpts:

Those of us who are called to fight for gender equality in the church need to be careful about how we measure success. We need to remember that we can only control what we do, we cannot control what anyone else does in response to what we do. We also need to remember that this change in the church will only come when hearts change, and we cannot change hearts. Only God can change a heart. He may use us as instruments to change hearts, but He is the one who does the heart changing.

Though tremendous legislative strides have been made regarding both racial and gender equality, it is sad but true to acknowledge that racism and sexism still exist. They exist because “isms” are not legal conditions, they are heart conditions and legislation does not change hearts. Civil rights legislation taught us that. I believe that if sexism and racism are to truly come to an end, hearts need to change in a way that leaves people color blind and gender blind, seeing each other as equal, different yet equal.

 

I have spent the last few days reviewing the edited version of my new manuscript, When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough, Swim Upstream.

Excerpts:

Though I understand that gender inequality is global, this book is specifically about gender inequality in the United States, and the role the Christian Church has played in maintaining this inequality.

…those of us who are committed to protesting gender inequality in the church need to make sure we are operating out of pure motives. We need to always keep in mind the critical difference between effecting change in the world and effecting change in the church …, i.e. fighting for gender equality in the church is not about women’s rights or affirmative action. It is about spiritual liberation. It is not about women leading the church. It is about truly allowing Christ to be the head of the church by following the leading of the Holy Spirit when choosing who will serve in what ministry roles. It is about allowing individuals with the spiritual gift of leadership to lead, and allowing individuals with the spiritual gift of preaching, to preach, regardless of their gender.

As we swim upstream to advocate or fight for gender equality in the church, conflict and controversy will inevitably follow. We need to face it head on and deal with it in healthy ways. That’s what Jesus and the early apostles did when conflict and controversy erupted in response to their efforts to transition people from the old covenant to the new covenant. However, we cannot be conflict creators. We cannot create conflict for the sake of creating conflict. If we do that we are not operating out of pure motives. On the other hand, we cannot be conflict avoiders. If we are conflict avoiders we are operating out of fear, and “God has not given us a spirit of fear and timidity, but of power, love, and self-discipline” (2 Timothy 1:7).

 

 

I finished the manuscript I’ve been working on. Will be titled When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough, Swim Upstream. Excerpt:

Those of us who are called to fight for gender equality in the church need to be careful about how we measure success. We need to remember that we can only control what we do, we cannot control what anyone else does in response to what we do. We also need to remember that this change in the church will only come when hearts change, and we cannot change hearts. Only God can change a heart. He may use us as instruments to change hearts, but He is the one who does the heart changing.

As we swim upstream to advocate or fight for gender equality in the church, conflict and controversy will inevitably follow. We need to face it head on and deal with it in healthy ways. That’s what Jesus and the early apostles did when conflict and controversy erupted in response to their efforts to transition people from the old covenant to the new covenant. However, we cannot be conflict creators. We cannot create conflict for the sake of creating conflict. If we do that we are not operating out of pure motives. On the other hand, we cannot be conflict avoiders. If we are conflict avoiders we are operating out of fear, and “God has not given us a spirit of fear and timidity, but of power, love, and self-discipline” (2 Timothy 1:7).

Introduction to manuscript I’m currently working on which will be titled When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough, Swim Upstream:

Political and social movements which have changed the course of human history have always been orchestrated by individuals with a clear vision, a consuming passion, the courage to swim upstream against the status quo, the willingness to deal with the consequences of swimming upstream, and the perseverance to keep going no matter what.

As a woman who passionately believes in gender equality and lives in Lancaster County PA, I swim upstream on an almost daily basis. It’s tiring and it’s isolating. In light of this, then, you might be wondering why in the world I continue to do it. I do it because I have a dream. I have a dream that the following words of Robert Kennedy, the Apostle Paul, and Martin Luther King, Jr will finally come true.

o“Some men see things as they are and say why. I dream things that never were and say why not.” Robert Kennedy spoke these words repeatedly as he campaigned for the democratic presidential nomination in 1968.
o“There is no longer Jew or Gentile, slave or free, male and female. For you are all one in Christ Jesus” (Galatians 3:28). The Apostle Paul wrote these words to the church in Galatia in the first century.
o”I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character”. Martin Luther King Jr. proclaimed these words to thousands of people on August 28, 1963 @ the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.

My dream is that children, as well as adults, will be able to pursue their dreams regardless of their gender, rather than being assigned roles based on their gender. Though I have this dream I do not have any illusions that I will lead a political or social movement which will result in full gender equality. I also have no illusions that gender equality will become a reality in my lifetime. Rather, I am hoping to plant seeds for change in some hearts.

My creative juices are FINALLY flowing after many months of them being dried up. I have been immersing myself in the writing of my new manuscript which will be titled When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough, Swim Upstream.

Excerpt from Introduction:

“Though I realize gender inequality is global, this book is specifically about gender inequality in the United States and the role the Christian Church has played in maintaining this inequality. I also realize that the United States is light years ahead of some other countries re: gender equality and I would like to take this opportunity to express my deep gratitude and appreciation for the strides that have been made in the U.S., and to applaud the courage and perseverance of the many men and women who swam upstream to make this happen.

Having said that, I also realize that we still have a way to go to achieve full gender equality in the United States. I believe that if sexism and racism are to truly come to an end people need to be color blind and gender blind, seeing each other as equal, different yet equal. Imposing affirmative action practices and equal pay for equal work legislation will not result in gender equality. Civil rights legislation taught us that. Don’t get me wrong, I am not opposed to affirmative action practices and equal pay for equal work legislation. I think both are good things. I believe, however, that lasting change begins on the inside. Our thoughts, feelings, attitudes and values change first. Then, our behavior changes to line up with the internal changes. Jesus Christ made this same point to a group of Pharisees when he said “A good person produces good things from the treasury of a good heart, and an evil person produces evil things from the treasury of an evil heart” (Matthew 12:35).

I am writing this book in the hope that the words you will read will light a fire in your heart, making it difficult, if not impossible, for you to stand idly by as long as any members of the human race are treated as inferior second class citizens.”