writing & publishing


Excerpt, When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough:

Question: Where do women belong in the twenty-first-century church?
Answer: Wherever God places them.

God has carved out places for every one of his daughters in his church, and he wants us to occupy the places he chose for us. Whatever spiritual gift or gifts you were given, you were given for a reason and a purpose, and he wants you to use it for the purpose he chose for you. He does not want you to hide it. If you choose to hide your gift(s), God is displeased. In his book The Purpose Driven Life Rick Warren states “You don’t bring glory or pleasure to God by hiding your abilities or by trying to be someone else. You only bring him enjoyment by being you. Anytime you reject any part of yourself, you are rejecting God’s wisdom and sovereignty in creating you.”

Link: https://www.amazon.com/When-Going-Flow-Enough-Upstream/dp/1625860714/

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The following excerpt from When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough has been running through my mind all morning, soooo I decided to share it. Here it is:

“I want them [my sisters in Christ] to be who they were created to be, to be free to operate in their spiritual gifts, and to fulfill the purpose for which they were created and designed to fulfill. I want the Church to not only give them permission to pursue their calling, but to also actively encourage and support them in doing so. I want the Church to tell them they are on equal footing with men and don’t need to fit themselves into prescribed roles.

Needless to say, we have a long way to go to make this happen. There are a lot of battles which will need to be fought and many streams in which individuals will need to swim upstream. Much conflict and controversy will follow. Whoever chooses to fight these battles or swim up these streams will need to be ready and willing to face a torrent of opposition. It will take people who have the determination of James Madison, the visionary leadership of Elizabeth Stanton, the dedication of Susan B. Anthony, the perseverance of Martin Luther King Jr., the amazing selflessness of the Freedom Riders, and the passion of Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Most of all though, it will take people whose hearts have been changed by Christ.”

If anyone is interested in reading more, here’s the link to purchase the book: https://www.amazon.com/When-Going-Flow-Enough-Upstream/dp/1625860714/

I need reviews of these two books:

When Therapy Isn’t Enough
https://www.amazon.com/dp/1625861117/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1531867727&sr=1-2&keywords=When+Therapy+Isn%27t+Enough

When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough
https://www.amazon.com/When-Going-Flow-Enough-Upstream/dp/1625860714/

If you are willing to read one or both books and post reviews on amazon and goodreads, I will be happy to send you a copy or copies as a gift. Just email me (marydet@ptd.net) and let me know what you are willing to read.

Thank you in advance for helping me.

This post is a follow-up to my 9/22 post, plumb line.

Excerpt from When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough:

In keeping with the culture of the time, Huldah…was identified as both a prophet and a wife when first introduced in Scripture. This would seem to indicate that she successfully lived out both her role as prophet and her role as wife…

When considering what exceptional women Deborah and Huldah were in light of the culture in which they lived, it is important not to overlook what exceptional men Barak and Josiah were. Both men were unique figures in the history of Israel due to their willingness to submit to the leadership of a woman…

Josiah intentionally seeking spiritual counsel from a female prophet during a time when four male prophets (Jeremiah, Zephaniah, Nahum, and Habbakuk) were living is nothing short of amazing. What is even more amazing is that King Josiah not only sought the counsel of a woman, he acted on it, instituting very radical reforms. Josiah must have seen something in Huldah similar to what Barak saw in Deborah. Scot McKnight, in The Blue Parakeet, states “Huldah is not chosen because no men were available; she is chosen because she is truly exceptional among the prophets.”

If you have a vision for a book and a passion for writing it, you will either give birth to it or be miserable. It’s like the feeling a pregnant woman has right at the end of the pregnancy when she wants to scream out loud “get this baby out of me!” (Speaking from personal experience). No one else can write that book because no one else has the same mix of life experiences and personality characteristics that you have. More importantly, no one else has the vision and the passion for it. Remember though, writing a book, getting it published, and marketing it is HARD work. So…….DON’T GIVE UP & DON’T BE AFRAID TO MAKE A MISTAKE!

Writers who didn’t give up:

• Dr. Seuss’s first book was rejected by 27 publishers.
• Max Lucado’s first book was rejected by 14 publishers.
• Stephen King’s first novel, Carrie, was rejected by 30 publishers.
Chicken Soup for the Soul was rejected 140 times.
• Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind was rejected by 38 publishers.
• James Joyce’s Dubliner was rejected 18 times and took nine years before it reached publication.
• J.K. Rowling’s first manuscript, Harry Potter, was rejected by 12 publishers before one was willing to give her a chance. That publisher, however, told her to get a day job because she had little chance of making money writing children’s books.

Writers who initially self-published:

Irma Rombauer spent half her life savings in 1931 to print copies of The Joy of Cooking. Five years later Bobbs-Merrill Company acquired the rights to her cookbook. It has now sold over 18 million copies.

Beatrix Potter self-published The Tale of Peter Rabbit in 1901. She printed 250 copies of the book. Within a year, it was picked up by one of the publishers who had previously rejected it, F. Warne & Co. The book almost immediately sold 20,000 copies. That company went on to publish 22 more of her books over the next 40 years. At present, over two million Beatrix Potter books are sold each year.

Richard Bolles self-published his job-hunting guide What Color Is Your Parachute? in 1970. In 1972, he found an independent publisher in Berkeley, CA who was willing to print small quantities of the book so that it could be frequently updated. In 1979, it appeared on the New York Times best-seller list and stayed there for more than a decade. Since then the book has been updated almost yearly; has periodically been on the New York Times best-seller list; has sold more than 10 million copies worldwide; and has never been out of print.

James Redfield self-published The Celestine Prophecy after the manuscript was repeatedly rejected by publishers. He sold 100,000 copies out of the trunk of his car before Warner Books agreed to publish it. It has now sold over 20 million copies worldwide.

John Grisham wrote his first novel, A Time to Kill, in 1989. After 28 rejections, he published 5,000 copies through Wynwood Press, a small private publisher. Doubleday eventually agreed to publish his books and after The Firm, The Pelican Brief and The Client all proved to be successful in the marketplace, Doubleday acquired the rights to A Time to Kill and reissued it

 

On the recommendation of a friend I submitted a proposal to be a presenter at the Maryland Counseling Association’s annual conference in November. The proposal was accepted. The title of my presentation is “The Intersection of Gender Equality, Mental Health and the Church”. The presentation will include content from When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough and When Therapy Isn’t Enough.

 

The following excerpt from When Going with the Flow Isn’t Enough has been on my mind a lot the last several days. I don’t know why. Maybe someone needs to read it, so I decided to share it. Here it is:

When an individual gives his or her life to God, that individual becomes part of God’s family. The Holy Spirit then comes to live inside that believer and endows him or her with spiritual gifts. A spiritual gift is an ability or talent that is given to an individual by God when he or she becomes part of God’s family. The Apostle Paul discussed spiritual gifts in his letter to the church in Corinth (1 Corinthians), his letter to the church in Rome (Romans 12), and his letter to the church in Ephesus (Ephesians 4).

 Important Point: There is no reference in any of Paul’s letters to gifts being distributed according to gender.

As I walked with Jesus I gradually came to the realization that I had been given the spiritual gift of leadership… As I tried to live out the purpose God had called me to, using the gifts he gave me, I ran into intense opposition. I crashed right into the stained glass ceiling. I was told that I was controlling (a bad thing) and that I was too strong of a leader (another bad thing)…I studied the difference between controlling and leading. I studied the difference between leading and managing.  I studied the difference between anointing and ordination. I read books on gender equality in the Church, and I studied the lives of women in the bible. As a result of all this I came to the unshakable conclusion that God is color blind and gender blind. He does not distribute gifts and assign purposes based on race or gender.

… as we grow into the people God created us to be, we become comfortable in our own skin. When we are comfortable in our own skin, we are able to unreservedly allow the people around us to be comfortable in their skin, to be who they are, who God created them to be. When we are not comfortable in our own skin, we often try to control our external circumstances and the people in our life in an effort to achieve that comfort. In her book Men and Women in the Church, Sarah Sumner, a noted author, international speaker, and dean of A. W. Tozer Theological Seminary, describes a time when she was impacted by people around her who were not comfortable in their own skins. “When I was a student at Trinity, one of my professors called me into his office and said to me in a warm, fatherly tone, ‘Sarah, do not show the full color of your plume; it will intimidate the men.’ She further stated ‘… every Christian woman is told not to lead too much.’”[i]

As I look back at the times I was told I was too strong of a leader and think about the people who told me this, I now understand that they were not comfortable in their own skins. If they were, they would not have been so threatened by me growing into the person and the leader God had anointed me to be.

[i] Sarah Sumner, Men And Women In The Church (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2003) pp. 26-27

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